Iftikhar

This isn't really about design anymore, but it's always about Iftikhar.

April 3, 2014 at 8:29pm
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“Tons of artists are involved,” said Mr. Maslansky, a painter who uses acrylic on bedsheets to depict couples (sometimes threesomes) engaged in sexual acts.”

— When the NYTimes sounds like satire.

2:17am
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Believe: this is Ira Glass

Believe: this is Ira Glass

12:16am
9,148 notes
Reblogged from durgapolashi

durgapolashi:

Arundhati Roy (1990s)

March 31, 2014 at 8:17pm
1 note

#Kushnernation

A little simplistic, yes, but good to hear an author demystify the life of an artist. 

Jon Wiener: Reno says, “I thought art came from a brooding solitude.” Do you agree with her about that?

Rachel Kushner: For me, art is not “brooding.” It comes from someplace that is more fun and that has a kind of electricity to it. People often consider the solitude aspect to be essential, that creativity is locked up inside you and you’re waiting for the moment to release it. I subscribe to a different worldview. It’s through engagement with the world, and not separation from it, that something with meaning gets produced.

6:13pm
50 notes
Reblogged from yoursfmoma
sfmoma:

yoursfmoma:

Mark du Suvero (Alcatraz in the background) #sfmoma #onthego #kickingarts #cultureandshit #therock #alcatraz #sanfrancisco by samueltmurray http://ift.tt/1hAOZL2

FYI… you have less than a month to check out Mark di Suvero at Crissy Field!

I really don’t want this to leave!

sfmoma:

yoursfmoma:

Mark du Suvero (Alcatraz in the background) #sfmoma #onthego #kickingarts #cultureandshit #therock #alcatraz #sanfrancisco by samueltmurray http://ift.tt/1hAOZL2

FYI… you have less than a month to check out Mark di Suvero at Crissy Field!

I really don’t want this to leave!

6:12pm
436 notes
Reblogged from 100yearsoflolitude

I saw the peculiar way America creeps up on you if you don’t have anything,” he told me. “It’s never rude. It’s just, Yes, you do have to work 14 hours. And yes, you do have to ride the bus home. You’re now the father of two and you will work in that cubicle or you will be dishonored. Suddenly the universe was laden with moral import, and I could intensely feel the limits of my own power. We didn’t have the money, and I could see that in order for me to get this much money, I would have to work for this many more years. It was all laid out in front of me, and suddenly absurdism wasn’t an intellectual abstraction, it was actually realism. You could see the way that wealth was begetting wealth, wealth was begetting comfort — and that the cumulative effect of an absence of wealth was the erosion of grace.

— That same George Saunders piece (via 100yearsoflolitude)

(via therumpus)

1:59am
21 notes
Reblogged from grupaok

grupaok:

Etel Adnan, 1977 (with thanks due Jesi Khadivi, who found the images)

1:58am
171 notes
Reblogged from jesuisperdu
jesuisperdu:

etel adnan
Untitled, 2013
[oil on canvas; 13 3/4 × 17 11/16 inches]

jesuisperdu:

etel adnan

Untitled, 2013

[oil on canvas; 13 3/4 × 17 11/16 inches]

1:58am
62 notes
Reblogged from grupaok

they tell me there are four seasons
but i live in a fifth one
which is your space
and your time

— Etel Adnan, Five Senses for One Death, The Smith, 1971
(via grupaok)

1:57am
45 notes
Reblogged from lormiguel
lormiguel:

2008 - Al-Halllaj, Qasaid, 2008. Watercolour and ink on Japanese book, 27 x 630 cm. © Etel Adnan. Courtesy Galerie Claude Lemand, Paris.
 
Dedicated to  grupa o.k.
 

lormiguel:

2008 - Al-Halllaj, Qasaid, 2008. Watercolour and ink on Japanese book, 27 x 630 cm. © Etel Adnan. Courtesy Galerie Claude Lemand, Paris.

 

Dedicated to  grupa o.k.

 

March 27, 2014 at 9:34pm
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Dope pen pals!

Dope pen pals!

March 25, 2014 at 3:41pm
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We’re interested in working with the Guggenheim and its architecture as a site to bring consciousness about the issues, because the Guggenheim uses its celebratory architecture in a very specific way, as a branding … so we’re rebranding the architecture,” Fischer said. “So last time we were inside, and this time we were outside on the facade.

— 

Activists Take Protest to the Facade of the Guggenheim Museum

12:41pm
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March 24, 2014 at 7:19pm
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I just wanna post this again

I just wanna post this again

7:13pm
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And for me, what was fascinating was that the maps these women were creating in their fictions — the social, critical, cognitive maps; these matrixes that they were plotting — were far more dangerous to the structures that had me pinioned than any of the criticisms that men of color were throwing down. What began to be clear to me as I read these women of color — Leslie Marmon Silko, Sandra Cisneros, Anjana Appachana, and throw in Octavia Butler and the great [Cherríe] Moraga of course — was that what these sisters were doing in their art was powerfully important for the community, for subaltern folks, for women writers of color, for male writers of color, for me. They were heeding [Audre] Lorde’s exhortation by forging the tools that could actually take down master’s house. To read these sisters in the 1980s as a young college student was not only intoxicating, it was soul-changing. It was metanoia.

— "The Search for Decolonial Love," Junot Diaz