Iftikhar

This isn't really about design anymore, but it's always about Iftikhar.

August 7, 2014 at 12:04am
268 notes
Reblogged from explore-blog

Outside views are often badges of seniority or achievement in the work world… But new evidence suggests employers should look at daylight exposure less as a mark of accomplishment and more as a matter of public health. So says an interdisciplinary team of architects and medical researchers that recently conducted a small case study comparing people exposed to natural light at their jobs with those who aren’t. The window workers scored better on common self-report health and sleep surveys; they also slept 46 minutes more a night, on average, as measured by a sleep monitor.

— 

Researchers find that windowless offices make workers lose sleep at night – which makes sense given how important daylight exposure is to regulating our internal clocks

Ongoing coverage of sleep here.

(via explore-blog)

(via 99percentinvisible)

August 6, 2014 at 11:49pm
4,277 notes
Reblogged from klovers

klovers:

Sade Adu

Trying soak up the summer white before labor day ya feel me?

(via angrywocunited)

May 27, 2014 at 2:56pm
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J. Lo always killin it

J. Lo always killin it

2:28pm
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Part of the problem, I think, is that we just don’t a large vocabulary for evaluating women other than to say they are sexually attractive or slutty or have a cool boyfriend.

— Yes, this is from an article about T Swift. Go girl

May 22, 2014 at 6:57pm
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May 19, 2014 at 1:45am
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Where and when do you do your writing? Any small room with no natural light will do.

— Zadie Smith

May 12, 2014 at 11:09pm
1 note
Read this to your best friend when at the beach. 

ETEL ADNAN: ON LOVE AND THE COSTWE ARE NOT WILLING TO PAY TODAY

Read this to your best friend when at the beach. 

ETEL ADNAN: ON LOVE AND THE COST
WE ARE NOT WILLING TO PAY TODAY

10:48pm
145 notes
Reblogged from 99percentinvisible

99percentinvisible:

The work of Charlie Anthony Ellis

10:44pm
214 notes
Reblogged from prepaidafrica
prepaidafrica:

But change comes slowly. One day, Mendelsund predicts, there will be a best-selling novel by an African writer that happens to use a different visual aesthetic, and its success will introduce a new set of arbitrary images to represent Africa in Western eyes. “But right now, we’re in the age of the tree,” he says. “For that vast continent, in all its diversity, you get that one fucking tree.”
The reason every book about Africa has the same cover—and it’s not pretty – Quartz

prepaidafrica:

But change comes slowly. One day, Mendelsund predicts, there will be a best-selling novel by an African writer that happens to use a different visual aesthetic, and its success will introduce a new set of arbitrary images to represent Africa in Western eyes. “But right now, we’re in the age of the tree,” he says. “For that vast continent, in all its diversity, you get that one fucking tree.”

The reason every book about Africa has the same cover—and it’s not pretty – Quartz

(via versobooks)

May 3, 2014 at 1:36am
1 note
National Life Insurance Company Building, project, 1924–25, by Frank Lloyd Wright

National Life Insurance Company Building, project, 1924–25, by Frank Lloyd Wright

May 1, 2014 at 2:27pm
1 note
I like book covers that look like movie posters. 

I like book covers that look like movie posters. 

April 3, 2014 at 8:29pm
1 note

“Tons of artists are involved,” said Mr. Maslansky, a painter who uses acrylic on bedsheets to depict couples (sometimes threesomes) engaged in sexual acts.”

— When the NYTimes sounds like satire.

2:17am
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Believe: this is Ira Glass

Believe: this is Ira Glass

12:16am
12,702 notes
Reblogged from durgapolashi

durgapolashi:

Arundhati Roy (1990s)

March 31, 2014 at 8:17pm
1 note

#Kushnernation

A little simplistic, yes, but good to hear an author demystify the life of an artist. 

Jon Wiener: Reno says, “I thought art came from a brooding solitude.” Do you agree with her about that?

Rachel Kushner: For me, art is not “brooding.” It comes from someplace that is more fun and that has a kind of electricity to it. People often consider the solitude aspect to be essential, that creativity is locked up inside you and you’re waiting for the moment to release it. I subscribe to a different worldview. It’s through engagement with the world, and not separation from it, that something with meaning gets produced.