Iftikhar

This isn't really about design anymore, but it's always about Iftikhar.

March 21, 2014 at 9:13pm
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I’m telling you guys, we’re never going to fucking get anywhere—if you want to hear my apocalyptic proclamation which I would never repeat, but which I know you motherfuckers are going to tweet about—we are never going to get anywhere as long as our economies of attraction continue to resemble, more or less, the economy of attraction of white supremacy.

— Junot Díaz realness

6:09pm
5,831 notes
Reblogged from sarabriseno

Why doesn’t feminist media treat immigration as an obvious feminist issue? Why doesn’t mainstream feminism seem to give a damn about undocumented women? Why aren’t more feminist organizations coming out in support of the Dream 9? As a comprehensive immigration reform bill is being butchered by Congress, accomplishing little more than further militarizing the border, and the Dream 9, largely led by women, continue making national headlines after participating in the most radical, risky act of civil disobedience in the history of the undocumented student movement, there is literally no excuse for the silence on behalf of feminist media.

— Immigration is a Feminist Issue—We Need to Treat it That Way by Tina Vasquez  (via sarabriseno)

(via angrywocunited)

6:08pm
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Rediscovered this gem on my comp

Rediscovered this gem on my comp

February 27, 2014 at 8:02pm
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"In His Words | Stillness in the Move" from T Magazine

Teju Cole’s new book extols the streets of Lagos, Nigeria, where he spent his youth. Here, he expounds on what’s so great about living in New York.

I love dancing, and I especially love being in a club at 2 a.m., when one or three drinks, good company and a gifted D.J. collectively liberate me into my body. The place could be Barbès in Park Slope, where old-school Guinean grooves silver the air, or perhaps I’m atWindfall in Midtown, enjoying the latest Nigerian Afrobeats and Congolese ndombolo. Wherever it is, I stop my habitual overthinking and become, quite simply, a body in the half-dark.

But this is not the highlight of such evenings, for afterward is the journey home to Brooklyn. From the back seat of a taxi, the city unfurls before me as a series of illuminated sights. If we go down the West Side Highway, we’ll pass by the apparition of One World Trade and enter the Tarkovsky-like glow of the Battery Tunnel. If we take the F.D.R., there’s the jeweler’s display of the bridges: Williamsburg, Manhattan, Brooklyn, all those dreamy rows of diamonds. At such moments, the city is mine alone: its immensity, its beauty, its clear streets, its silent waterways. It is open in a way daylight would never permit. I lose myself in it and belong to it, a happiness no less real for being so fleeting.

Teju Cole’s “Every Day Is for the Thief” will be published by Random House on March 25.

2:29pm
25 notes
Reblogged from drawingstorage
the-drawing-center:

drawingstorage:

Felice Serreli, 2013, Quotidiana 07, paper tissue, 20x30 cm

[The Drawing Center is featuring Drawing Storage posts on our blog for the next few weeks.]

the-drawing-center:

drawingstorage:

Felice Serreli, 2013, Quotidiana 07, paper tissue, 20x30 cm

[The Drawing Center is featuring Drawing Storage posts on our blog for the next few weeks.]

2:17pm
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“When I hear people say, ‘We’re all people, we’re all human, I don’t see color,’ to me that means, ‘I don’t see you, you don’t exist,’ ” said Mr. Ngo, who added that he had been subjected to racial and homophobic epithets.

— Colorblind Notion Aside, Colleges Grapple with Racial Tension, via NYTimes

February 26, 2014 at 6:11pm
726 notes
Reblogged from fuckyeahsouthasia

unapologetically-brown-deactiva asked: Do you know of any South Asian history books/literature accessible in the US that are written by Pakistani/South Asian authors? All the sources I find are written by white men.

inautumn-inkashmir:

fuckyeahsouthasia:

Here’s a small list. Happy reading!

Fiction:

God of Small Things — Arundhati Roy

Midnight’s Children — Salman Rushdie

A Suitable Boy — Virkram Seth

Clear Light of Day — Anita Desai

The Shadow Lines — Amitav Ghosh

A Fine Balance — Rohinton Mistry (if you really want to bawl your eyes out)

The White Tiger — Aravind Adiga

The Inheritance of Loss — Kiran Desai

Malgudi Days — R.K. Narayan

How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia — Mohsin Hamad

Anything by Chetan Bhagat, if you really want to know what people in India are reading. He’s unbearable.

Non-Fiction:

India After Gandhi — Ramachandra Guha

The Argumentative Indian: Writings on Indian History, Culture, and Identity —  Amartya Sen

The Great Partition: The Making of India — Yasmin Khan

The Discovery of India — Jawaharlal Nehru

Tinderbox: The Past and Future of Pakistan — M.J. Akbar

Pashtun Tales: From the Pakistan-Afghan Frontier — Aisha Ahmed, Roger Boase

I Am Malala — Malala Yousafzai (She just wrote a book. I really liked it. I reviewed it here)

City of Djinns: A Year in Delhi — William Dalrymple (He’s British, but this is an exquisite book. Very good read. His others are also quite good.)

This list is India-centric, I know. I’m sorry, I know you wanted more Pakistan. If any of our followers can add to this list, that would be great!

— heyitsjuliuspepperwood (Jaya)

The Wandering Falcon, by Jamil Ahmad

English, August, by Upamanyu Chatterjee

Moth Smoke and the Reluctant Fundamentalist, both by Mohsin Hamid (I know he’s on here, but I like these two books much better than his latest)

A Case of Exploding Mangoes, Mohamed Hanif

The Immortals, Amit Chaudhuri

Red Earth and Pouring Rain, by Vikram Chandra

The Crow Eaters and Cracking India, Bapsi Sidhwa

The Great Partition, Yasmin Khan

Animal’s People and the Death of Mister Love, by Indra Sinha

Shalimar, by Kamala Markandaya

The Veiled Suite: The Collected Poems, Agha Shahid Ali

Narcopolis, Jeet Thayil

The Wish Maker, Ali Sethi

6:06pm
31,890 notes
Reblogged from gifthetv

Lupita Nyong’o breaks down the importance of having role models in the media and what they tell us about our psyche [x]

(Source: gifthetv, via styleisstyle)

February 25, 2014 at 3:05pm
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Sketches from the elBulli kitchen

Sketches from the elBulli kitchen

February 24, 2014 at 5:04pm
1 note
Vote of confidence for those hair mountains. 

Vote of confidence for those hair mountains. 

5:01pm
3 notes
Celebs can stop arguing over me now bc I’ve officially christened Sofia Coppola as my celebrity look alike. Sofia Coppola for Vogue Italia

Celebs can stop arguing over me now bc I’ve officially christened Sofia Coppola as my celebrity look alike. 

Sofia Coppola for Vogue Italia

February 18, 2014 at 8:47pm
4 notes
Reblogged from animinimalism
animinimalism:

Meet the Woman Who Waged an Artistic War Against Her Street Harassers
For many women, just walking down the street can mean being subject to harassment by men—from subtle comments to overtly hostile remarks. Back in 2012, fed up with such treatment, Tatyana Fazlalizadeh, an oil painter by trade, decided to speak out: She produced an illustrated self-portrait with a caption—”Stop Telling Women To Smile”—and plastered copies all around her Brooklyn neighborhood. Since then, Fazlalizadeh has created countless posters, literally taking to the street to combat sexist harassment. Each piece features a different woman, with a caption that reflects her own experiences with public harassment. With $35,000 raised on Kickstarter, Fazlalizadeh has now taken her project, named after that first caption, on the road. In January, after traveling to Chicago and Boston to interview women there about how they experience public space, she’ll be heading to the West Coast.

animinimalism:

Meet the Woman Who Waged an Artistic War Against Her Street Harassers

For many women, just walking down the street can mean being subject to harassment by men—from subtle comments to overtly hostile remarks. Back in 2012, fed up with such treatment, Tatyana Fazlalizadeh, an oil painter by trade, decided to speak out: She produced an illustrated self-portrait with a caption—”Stop Telling Women To Smile”—and plastered copies all around her Brooklyn neighborhood. Since then, Fazlalizadeh has created countless posters, literally taking to the street to combat sexist harassment. Each piece features a different woman, with a caption that reflects her own experiences with public harassment. With $35,000 raised on Kickstarter, Fazlalizadeh has now taken her project, named after that first caption, on the road. In January, after traveling to Chicago and Boston to interview women there about how they experience public space, she’ll be heading to the West Coast.

8:46pm
11,778 notes
Reblogged from beyonce
For real B??

For real B??

(Source: beyonce, via devoutfashion)

8:45pm
4,095 notes
Reblogged from cabinporn
cabinporn:

Abandoned hut in Westfjords, Iceland.
Contributed by Roadside Iceland. 

cabinporn:

Abandoned hut in Westfjords, Iceland.

Contributed by Roadside Iceland

8:43pm
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Adrian PiperVanilla Nightmares #141986

Adrian Piper
Vanilla Nightmares #14
1986