Iftikhar

This isn't really about design anymore, but it's always about Iftikhar.

March 31, 2014 at 1:59am
23 notes
Reblogged from grupaok

grupaok:

Etel Adnan, 1977 (with thanks due Jesi Khadivi, who found the images)

1:58am
173 notes
Reblogged from jesuisperdu
jesuisperdu:

etel adnan
Untitled, 2013
[oil on canvas; 13 3/4 × 17 11/16 inches]

jesuisperdu:

etel adnan

Untitled, 2013

[oil on canvas; 13 3/4 × 17 11/16 inches]

1:58am
62 notes
Reblogged from grupaok

they tell me there are four seasons
but i live in a fifth one
which is your space
and your time

— Etel Adnan, Five Senses for One Death, The Smith, 1971
(via grupaok)

1:57am
46 notes
Reblogged from lormiguel
lormiguel:

2008 - Al-Halllaj, Qasaid, 2008. Watercolour and ink on Japanese book, 27 x 630 cm. © Etel Adnan. Courtesy Galerie Claude Lemand, Paris.
 
Dedicated to  grupa o.k.
 

lormiguel:

2008 - Al-Halllaj, Qasaid, 2008. Watercolour and ink on Japanese book, 27 x 630 cm. © Etel Adnan. Courtesy Galerie Claude Lemand, Paris.

 

Dedicated to  grupa o.k.

 

March 27, 2014 at 9:34pm
0 notes
Dope pen pals!

Dope pen pals!

March 25, 2014 at 3:41pm
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We’re interested in working with the Guggenheim and its architecture as a site to bring consciousness about the issues, because the Guggenheim uses its celebratory architecture in a very specific way, as a branding … so we’re rebranding the architecture,” Fischer said. “So last time we were inside, and this time we were outside on the facade.

— 

Activists Take Protest to the Facade of the Guggenheim Museum

12:41pm
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March 24, 2014 at 7:19pm
0 notes
I just wanna post this again

I just wanna post this again

7:13pm
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And for me, what was fascinating was that the maps these women were creating in their fictions — the social, critical, cognitive maps; these matrixes that they were plotting — were far more dangerous to the structures that had me pinioned than any of the criticisms that men of color were throwing down. What began to be clear to me as I read these women of color — Leslie Marmon Silko, Sandra Cisneros, Anjana Appachana, and throw in Octavia Butler and the great [Cherríe] Moraga of course — was that what these sisters were doing in their art was powerfully important for the community, for subaltern folks, for women writers of color, for male writers of color, for me. They were heeding [Audre] Lorde’s exhortation by forging the tools that could actually take down master’s house. To read these sisters in the 1980s as a young college student was not only intoxicating, it was soul-changing. It was metanoia.

— "The Search for Decolonial Love," Junot Diaz

March 21, 2014 at 9:13pm
1 note

I’m telling you guys, we’re never going to fucking get anywhere—if you want to hear my apocalyptic proclamation which I would never repeat, but which I know you motherfuckers are going to tweet about—we are never going to get anywhere as long as our economies of attraction continue to resemble, more or less, the economy of attraction of white supremacy.

— Junot Díaz realness

6:09pm
5,856 notes
Reblogged from sarabriseno

Why doesn’t feminist media treat immigration as an obvious feminist issue? Why doesn’t mainstream feminism seem to give a damn about undocumented women? Why aren’t more feminist organizations coming out in support of the Dream 9? As a comprehensive immigration reform bill is being butchered by Congress, accomplishing little more than further militarizing the border, and the Dream 9, largely led by women, continue making national headlines after participating in the most radical, risky act of civil disobedience in the history of the undocumented student movement, there is literally no excuse for the silence on behalf of feminist media.

— Immigration is a Feminist Issue—We Need to Treat it That Way by Tina Vasquez  (via sarabriseno)

(via angrywocunited)

6:08pm
0 notes
Rediscovered this gem on my comp

Rediscovered this gem on my comp

February 27, 2014 at 8:02pm
0 notes

"In His Words | Stillness in the Move" from T Magazine

Teju Cole’s new book extols the streets of Lagos, Nigeria, where he spent his youth. Here, he expounds on what’s so great about living in New York.

I love dancing, and I especially love being in a club at 2 a.m., when one or three drinks, good company and a gifted D.J. collectively liberate me into my body. The place could be Barbès in Park Slope, where old-school Guinean grooves silver the air, or perhaps I’m atWindfall in Midtown, enjoying the latest Nigerian Afrobeats and Congolese ndombolo. Wherever it is, I stop my habitual overthinking and become, quite simply, a body in the half-dark.

But this is not the highlight of such evenings, for afterward is the journey home to Brooklyn. From the back seat of a taxi, the city unfurls before me as a series of illuminated sights. If we go down the West Side Highway, we’ll pass by the apparition of One World Trade and enter the Tarkovsky-like glow of the Battery Tunnel. If we take the F.D.R., there’s the jeweler’s display of the bridges: Williamsburg, Manhattan, Brooklyn, all those dreamy rows of diamonds. At such moments, the city is mine alone: its immensity, its beauty, its clear streets, its silent waterways. It is open in a way daylight would never permit. I lose myself in it and belong to it, a happiness no less real for being so fleeting.

Teju Cole’s “Every Day Is for the Thief” will be published by Random House on March 25.

2:29pm
25 notes
Reblogged from drawingstorage
the-drawing-center:

drawingstorage:

Felice Serreli, 2013, Quotidiana 07, paper tissue, 20x30 cm

[The Drawing Center is featuring Drawing Storage posts on our blog for the next few weeks.]

the-drawing-center:

drawingstorage:

Felice Serreli, 2013, Quotidiana 07, paper tissue, 20x30 cm

[The Drawing Center is featuring Drawing Storage posts on our blog for the next few weeks.]

2:17pm
0 notes

“When I hear people say, ‘We’re all people, we’re all human, I don’t see color,’ to me that means, ‘I don’t see you, you don’t exist,’ ” said Mr. Ngo, who added that he had been subjected to racial and homophobic epithets.

— Colorblind Notion Aside, Colleges Grapple with Racial Tension, via NYTimes